Did the church apologize to Galileo?

Did the church admit Galileo was right?

Last week, 359 years later, the Church finally agreed. At a ceremony in Rome, before the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Pope John Paul II officially declared that Galileo was right. The formal rehabilitation was based on the findings of a committee of the Academy the Pope set up in 1979, soon after taking office.

What was the church’s response to Galileo?

But four centuries ago, the idea of a heliocentric solar system was so controversial that the Catholic Church classified it as a heresy, and warned the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei to abandon it.

How did Galileo say sorry?

Galileo must have been a tremendously beautiful man, not at all pathological. He said, “Okay, then I apologize. But my apology won’t make much difference – the earth will still go on round and round the sun.

Was Galileo burned at the stake?

By the end of his trial, Galileo was forced to recant his own scientific findings as “abjured, cursed and detested,” a renunciation that caused him great personal anguish but which saved him from being burned at the stake.

Who was burned at the stake by the Catholic Church?

On May 30, 1431, Joan of Arc was burned at the stake. The Hundred Years’ War waged on until 1453, with the French finally beating back the English invaders. In 1450, Joan’s guilty verdict was overturned by a Rehabilitation Trial ordered by Charles VII.

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Which scientists were persecuted by the church?

Galileo (1564-1642)

His research was instantly criticized by the Catholic Church for going against the established scripture that places Earth and not the Sun at the center of the universe.

When did the Catholic Church acknowledge that the Earth revolves around the sun?

In 1758, the Catholic Church formally decided that saying the Earth revolves around the sun was not heretical.

How was Galileo punished by the Catholic Church?

Responding to mounting controversy over theology, astronomy and philosophy, the Roman Inquisition tried Galileo in 1633, found him “vehemently suspect of heresy”, and sentenced him to house arrest where he remained until his death in 1642.