What teaching of Jesus is called the Golden Rule?

What is Jesus golden rule?

The Golden Rule tells Christians to treat other people as they would like to be treated. So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12.

Why is it called the golden rule?

The Golden Rule is a moral which says treat others as you would like them to treat you. This moral in various forms has been used as a basis for society in many cultures and civilizations. It is called the ‘golden’ rule because there is value in having this kind of respect and caring attitude for one another.

What does the Bible say about Golden Rule?

In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you: do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.

How does Christianity use the golden rule?

Golden Rule, precept in the Gospel of Matthew (7:12): “In everything, do to others what you would have them do to you. . . .” This rule of conduct is a summary of the Christian’s duty to his neighbour and states a fundamental ethical principle.

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Why is the golden rule so important in Christianity?

Well, it’s a powerful way of saying that we should recognise the respective dignity for those around us. While also not forgetting that we are all capable of inflicting immoral actions. The Golden Rule Christianity speaks of is vital in following the commandments of God. Thus, creating a more virtuous world.

Who called it the golden rule?

The “Golden Rule” was proclaimed by Jesus of Nazareth during his Sermon on the Mount and described by him as the second great commandment. The common English phrasing is “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”.

What philosopher said the golden rule?

More, Confucius himself made the golden rule an unrivaled centerpiece of his philosophy of life (The Analects, 1962). The rule, Kung-shu, came full-blown from the very lips and writings of the “morality giver” and in seemingly universal form.